~ TLW ~ Topics for Discussion ~ Page Two

~ Topic Discussion ~ 209 ~ Education: East and West ~

Education in South Korea

 

Adapted from Wikipedia and other sites

 

South Korean students have been praised for various reasons including their comparatively high results in standardized testing and their consequent role in bringing about Korea's economic development. On a micro-level, traditionally, mothers employ their skills to act as educators themselves¡¦ devoting their time to their children.

 

However, its rigid, hierarchical structure has been criticized for lowering innovation. It has also been described as 'intensely competitive'. This rigid and competitive system has sometimes been associated with a high level of alienation among the youth in South Korea. Examinations to enter university are notorious for levels of difficulty, yet most students appear to be amazingly resilient. Search for other ideas/opinions... 

Education in Japan

 

Adapted from Wikipedia and other sites

 

In Japan, education prior to elementary school is provided at kindergartens and day-care centers. Public and private day-care centers take children from under the age of one to five years old. This has much to do with household income (as in other countries). Mothers with adequate income stay home to raise their children.

 

There are many and diverse ways and means of education in in the secondary and tertiary levels of education in Japan. Some seem to suggest that Japanese students are shy and less willing to talk than students in other nations. What¡¯s your opinion? Search for other ideas/opinions... 

Education in China

 

Adapted from Wikipedia and other sites

 

All citizens must attend school for at least nine years which the government funds.

 

The Ministry of Education reported a 99 percent attendance rate for primary school and an 80 percent rate for both primary and middle schools (this statistic remains questionable). 

 

In 2003, There were 1,552 institutions of higher learning (colleges and universities), 725,000 professors, and 11 million students. There are over 100 National Universities. Chinese spending on education has grown by 20% per year since 1999 now reaching over $100bn. There were as many as 1.5 million science and engineering students graduated from Chinese universities in 2006. Search for other ideas/opinions... 

 

 

Education in Canada

 

Adapted from Wikipedia and other sites

 

Canada spends about 5.4% of its GDP on education. The country invests heavily in tertiary education (universities and colleges) spending more than 20,000 USD per student. The high school graduation rate as of 2011 was at about 79%. Given these statistics, Canada is a leader in the world of education...

 

Search for other ideas/opinions... 

 

 

Education in the USA (the United States)

 

Adapted from Wikipedia and other sites

 

Public education is universally available, with control and funding coming from the state, local, and federal government.

 

88% of school-age children attend public schools, 9% attend private schools, and nearly 3% are home-schooled. Private schools are generally free to determine their own curriculum and staffing policies.

 

The high school graduation rate as of 2011 was at about 78%. Search for other ideas/opinions... 

Education in England

 

Adapted from Wikipedia and other sites

 

Education in England is overseen by the United Kingdom's Department for Education. Local government authorities are responsible for implementing policy for public education and state-funded schools ~ standard beaurocracy.

 

The education system is divided into stages based upon age: early years foundation stage (ages 3–5), primary education (ages 5–11), secondary education (ages 11–18), and tertiary education (ages 18+).

 

From the age of 16 there is a two-year period of education known as "sixth form" or "college" which typically leads to A-level qualifications (similar to a high school diploma in some other countries).

 

Some consider the system antiquated. Search for other ideas/opinions... 

208Set ~ 3 ~

1) What are the similarities and differences in the Eastern and Western examples given above?

2) What problems are there? Is there an ideal system. Try to propose such a system.

3) What is the role of public funding in education? Who should get it. How much? Under what conditions?

4) Of the six examples given above, which do you think is the most successful? The least successful?

5) Tell about your own experience in education? Would you change anything in your educational system?

6) Did you experience any stress or harm due to any elements in your country¡¯s educational system?

 

~ Follow up ~ Try to make some of your own questions regarding education in the East and West.

Kindle Fire

Kindle Reader

~ Discuss with a teacher, in pairs, or in groups ~ Then share your results in a classroom discussion ~

1) To begin with, in groups or in pairs, select the questions you¡¯d like to talk about. 

2) Then, in pairs or in groups, ask questions and share ideas in your conversations .

3) Finally, share your ideas (as a whole) in a classroom discussion (with all pairs/groups).

 

For specifics, see TLW Classroom Lesson Procedures: Click here     Click to print QUESTIONS/QUESTIONS

.docx                .doc

208Set ~ 2 ~

1) Compare the educational systems above. What are the similarities and differences?

2) Do you believe in the idea of school boards (elected officials determining educational policies)?

3) What do you think of homeschooling? Who should make the standards? What are the pros and cons?

4) Select and browse the sites below. Discuss the issues that are raised.

5) How much should the government spend on tertiary education for each individual student?

 

~ Follow up ~ Try to make some of your own questions regarding education in the West.

208Set ~ 1 ~

1) Compare (and research) the educational systems above. What are the similarities and differences?

2) Do you dispute any of the information offered above? (search the internet, if necessary) If so, explain

3) Was intense competition or alienation a part of your educational experience? Give examples.

4) How early should children begin schooling? Should there be entrance exams to primary school?

5) How much government spending should there be for primary, secondary, and tertiary education?

 

~ Follow up ~ Try to make some of your own questions regarding education in the East.

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