~ Dialogue ~ Topic 9 ~ Conversation ~ Discuss Questions and Answers ~

 

1) What are some of your favorite topics of conversation (movies, family, sports) Why?

I really like talking about personal stories. They may be about places people have lived,

they may be about good or bad times people have been through, they may be about

pivotal moments or experiences that set someone (anyone) on a new life course.

I guess I like talking about the things that really matter to people.

 

2) What makes someone easy to talk to? Difficult to talk to? Is it personality?

People who enjoy their lives are easy to talk to. People who don’t often shy away.

Perhaps studying a foreign language can open people up to new communication.

Perhaps people can express themselves differently in another language.

 

3) Have you ever had a conversation with a stranger or a traveler? About what?

The most memorable discussion was with Moroccan nomads. I was there with an NGO.

We were building wells and solar structures. I had the privilege to converse with the elders.

 

4) Who do you argue with? What about? How long? Do you usually win?

I rarely argue. I consider argument a last resort… But it’s sometimes necessary.

Yet, My children rarely listen to me. We mostly argue about their future. No one wins.

 

5) What's the difference between phone and face-to-face conversations? Explain.

I have to use the phone to talk to the people far from me. I’d much rather be with them.

The longer you are away from someone, the more distant they become. Phones don’t help.

 

6) How are your conversations with women different from those with men?

With the Me Too movement, everything has changed. My view is that the differences

between men and women are different in each society. All genders are becoming more aware.

 

7) Does alcohol improve or impede your conversational skills? Explain.

Case by case… It depends on the company you keep. Moderation is the key element.

There is a tipping point where jovial chat may turn into unnecessary argument and worse.

 

8) Do you have good conversations with your family? relatives? in-laws? Explain.

My best conversations were with my eldest sister. She knows most of our family history.

Yet, our political and social opinions are in opposition. I’m afraid we can’t remain friends.

 

9) What famous people (past/present) would you like to talk to? About what?

I’d like to hang out with Marco Polo, Einstein, Albert Schwitzer, Marie Curie, Rumi,

Ghandi, Cleopatra, John Coltrane, Obama, and Confucius and talk about climate change.

 

10) Talk about a really good conversation you had recently. Who with? What about?

Recently I talked with my younger sister. It was good to reconnect. I hadn’t been in touch

with her for a long time. I guess she’s back on her feet now. Remarried. She sounds good.

 

 

~ Original Questions ~  Conversation ~ Choose the questions you like ~

 

Group A

1) What makes someone easy to talk to? Difficult to talk to?

2) What are some of your favorite topics of conversation?

3) What topics do you prefer not to talk about? Explain.

4) Are there any topics that are taboo in your community of friends? Why?

5) Who do you argue with? What about? How long? Do you usually win?

 

Group B

1) Have you ever had a great conversation with a stranger? About what?

2) How do you begin a conversation with someone you haven't met recently?

3) How do you keep a conversation going? Do you have any techniques?

4) How do you end a conversation when you are busy (or bored)?

5) What's the difference between phone and face-to-face conversations?

 

Group C

1) How are your conversations with women different from those with men?

2) What do men in your country like to talk about? How about women?

3) Which do you think are better conversationalists, men or women? How so?

4) Is flirting common in your country? Why or why not? Who flirts?

5) What are some good and bad habits people have while conversing?

 

Group D

1) How important is nonverbal communication in conversations?

2) Does alcohol improve or impede your conversational skills? Explain.

3) How do the conversations differ between your family member?

4) Do you have good conversations with your relatives? your in-laws? Explain.

5) If you could have a conversation with a famous person, who would it be?

 

Group E

1) What would you like to ask a famous person? Would you like to be famous? Why?

2) Talk about a difficult conversation you had in your life? Who with? What about?

3) Talk about a really good conversation you had recently. Who with? What about?

4) Why do people like to eavesdrop on other people's conversations?

5) How do you think you can improve your conversation skills?

 

 

~ Food for Thought ~ Topic 9 ~ Conversation ~ Explore the Topic ~

 

Nonverbal Communication

 

source

 

How to Avoid Boring Conversation

 

source

 

How to Make Conversation After Arguments

 

source

 

Tips for Keeping a Conversation Going

 

source

 

 

As far as playing jazz, no other art form, other than conversation, can give the satisfaction

of spontaneous interaction. —Stan Getz

 

Conversation would be vastly improved by the constant use of four simple words: I do not know. 

Andre Maurois

 

Two monologues do not make a dialogue. Jeff Daly

 

Most conversations are simply monologues delivered in the presence of a witness. 

Margaret Millar

 

Even a fish wouldn't get into trouble if he kept his mouth shut. Anonymous

 

It was impossible to get a conversation going, everybody was talking too much.—Yogi Berra

 

Let us make a special effort to stop communicating with each other,

so we can have some conversation.

 —Mark Twain

 

Marriage is one long conversation, checkered by disputes. —Robert Louis Stevenson 

 

source

 

 

Lesson Procedures/How to make a lesson

 

1) To begin, as a class, in groups, or in pairs, select the questions youd like to talk about. 

2) Then, ask questions and share ideas in your conversations. Take notes. Take equal turns.

3) Share your ideas (each individual) in a classroom discussion (as prepared in 1, 2, and 3).

 

There are three sections for each topic:

 

1) Dialogue: There are ten selected questions presented with sample answers.

                   The sample answers are given to assist the learners in creating

                     their own answers. They tend to use a casual speaking style.

 

2) Original Questions: There are five groups of five questions with no answers.

                                           They are introduced to give more choices to learners.

 

3) Food for Thought: Definitions, ideas, and links are offered for discussion and deliberation.

 

Explore the possibilities. Use the web. Make your own questions. Take equal turns.

 

 

 

~ Topic 9 ~ Conversation ~ Questions for Conversation ~

Honor your mistakes, they will lead to learning...

Through this learning, more mistakes will be made…

Through this process, mistakes are no longer mistakes…

They become the act of learning.

 

TLW

 

                          

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