~ Dialogue ~ Topic 15 ~ Money and Shopping ~ Discuss Questions and Answers ~

 

1) Are you saving money to buy something? If so, what are you planning to buy?

Yes. I’m saving up for a vacation to Tahiti. Of course I need to buy airline tickets

and book a hotel, but I want to buy a new camera to record the experience.

 

2) Do you enjoy window shopping? If so, when and how often? Why do you do it?

Only once in a while. I go window shopping when I’m thinking about making

a big purchase like a new computer or shoes… or a gift for someone.

 

3) Do you ever buy secondhand/used products (clothes, furniture, appliances)?

We bought a secondhand washing machine several years ago, but it just broke down.

This time, we bought a new one, and it has a ten-year warranty. It looks good, too.

 

4) Do you gamble, buy lottery tickets, or go to the race track? Do you have a story?

Once every blue moon, I buy a lottery ticket, but they never pay off. The last time

we went to Las Vegas, I blew about a hundred bucks on blackjack. But it was fun.

 

5) Is haggling common in your country? Do you always haggle at the market?

Yes. Absolutely. We challenge prices on a regular basis, mostly at the markets.

Of course it’s nearly impossible to haggle at department stores, malls, or outlets.

 

6) Do you put money in the stock market, real estate, or other investments? Is it wise?

I invested in Bitcoin a year ago, but I haven’t made any profit from it. I guess I’ll

just hold on to it for a while. I think investing requires incredible patience.

 

7) Have you ever had any money stolen from you? What happened?

My wallet was stolen from a locker at a spa. The thief  took my key while I was

in the sauna and broke into my locker. Thanks to CCTV, everything was recovered.

 

8) Have you ever been 'scammed' or 'ripped off '? What happened?

Yes. I bought some t-shirts in Viet Nam. They were very colorful and beautiful.

But after I washed them, they more or less fell apart. The material was defective.

 

9) What is the average salary in your country? Is it enough for people to live well?

The average salary here is enough for a small family ( 3 people) to live well,

but not for 4 people or more. Both parents often have to work to make ends meet.

 

10) What's the most money you've ever spent on dinner? Where? What did you order?

That was probably in Tokyo at a nice sushi bar. We stayed there for the entire

dinner service (from 5 to 10 pm). I remember the warm sake being especially good.

 

 

~ Original Questions ~  Money and Shopping Choose the questions you like ~

 

Group A

1) Are you saving money to buy something? If so, what are you planning to buy? How much will it cost?

2) Do you compare prices at different stores when you shop for expensive goods?

3) Do you enjoy window shopping? If so, when and how often?

4) Do you ever buy second-hand/used products (clothes, furniture, etc.)?

5) Do you ever give money to charity? If so, how often and to whom?

 

Group B

1) Do you gamble, buy lottery tickets, or go to the race track? Have you ever won? Do you have a story?

2) Is haggling common in your country? Do you always haggle at the market? Tell your tale.

3) How many credit cards do you have? Do you use them all? Explain. How important are they?

4) Do you enjoy shopping at the supermarket? Why or why not? How much time do you spend there?

5) Do you put money in the stock market, real estate, or in other investments? Is it wise? Explain.

 

Group C

1) Do you sometimes buy things that you don't need? If so, give some examples.

2) What goods and services are cheaper in your own country? Why do you think so?

3) What goods and services are more expensive in your own country? Why do you think so?

4) Have you ever had any money stolen from you? What happened?

5) Have you ever been 'scammed' or 'ripped off ' (tricked out of your money)? What happened?

 

Group D

1) What is the average salary in your country? Is it enough for people to live well? Explain.

2) Do you ever shop at discount stores ('one-dollar shops')? What do you buy?

3) How often do you buy new clothes or shoes? Where do you shop?

4) Do you ever shop online? What sites? How often? What do you buy?

5) Have you ever been to a large shopping mall? Where? Talk about your experience.

 

Group E

1) What's the most money you've ever spent on dinner? Where? What did you order?

2) Who pays for weddings in your country? Is it very expensive? What do you think about it?

3) In a marriage, do you think one person should handle the finances? Explain.

4) Should children get an allowance (pocket money) from their parents? How much?

5) What do these proverbs mean: “Time is money” or “You can't take it with you when you go”.

                     

 

~ Food for Thought ~ Topic 15 ~ Money and Shopping ~ Explore the Topic ~

 

Shopper profiles:

 

1) Quality conscious/Perfectionist: Quality-consciousness is characterized by a consumer's search for the very best quality in products; quality conscious consumers tend to shop systematically making more comparisons and shopping around.

 

2) Brand-conscious: Brand-consciousness is characterized by a tendency to buy expensive, well-known brands or designer labels. Those who score high on brand-consciousness tend to believe that the higher prices are an indicator of quality and exhibit a preference for department stores or top-tier retail outlets.

 

3) Recreation-conscious/Hedonistic: Recreational shopping is characterized by the consumer's engagement in the purchase process. Those who score high on recreation-consciousness regard shopping itself as a form of enjoyment.

 

4) Price-conscious: A consumer who exhibits price-and-value consciousness. Price-conscious shoppers carefully shop around seeking lower prices, sales or discounts and are motivated by obtaining the best value for money.

 

5) Novelty/fashion-conscious: characterized by a consumer's tendency to seek out new products or new experiences for the sake of excitement; who gain excitement from seeking new things; they like to keep up-to-date with fashions and trends, variety-seeking is associated with this dimension.

 

6) Impulsive: Impulsive consumers are somewhat careless in making purchase decisions, buy on the spur of the moment and are not overly concerned with expenditure levels or obtaining value. Those who score high on impulsive dimensions tend not to be engaged with the object at either a cognitive or emotional level.

 

7) Confused (by over-choice): characterized by a consumer's confusion caused by too many product choices, too many stores or an overload of product information; tend to experience information overload.

 

8) Habitual/brand loyal: characterized by a consumer's tendency to follow a routine purchase pattern on each purchase occasion; consumers have favorite brands or stores and have formed habits in choosing; the purchase decision does not involve much evaluation or shopping around.

 

source

 

The development of window shopping as a form of recreation is strongly associated with the rise of the middle classes in seventeenth and eighteenth-century Europe.

 

As standards of living improved in the during this period, consumers from a broad range of social backgrounds began to purchase goods that were in excess of basic necessities. An emergent middle class or bourgeoisie stimulated demand for luxury goods and the act of shopping came to be seen as a pleasurable pastime or form of entertainment.

 

Shopping for pleasure became a particularly important activity for middle and upper-class women, since it allowed them to enter the public sphere without the need for a chaperone.

 

source

 

 

                                                                   

 

 

 

 

Lesson Procedures/How to make a lesson

 

1) To begin, as a class, in groups, or in pairs, select the questions youd like to talk about. 

2) Then, ask questions and share ideas in your conversations. Take notes. Take equal turns.

3) Share your ideas (each individual) in a classroom discussion (as prepared in 1, 2, and 3).

 

There are three sections for each topic:

 

1) Dialogue: There are ten selected questions presented with sample answers.

                   The sample answers are given to assist the learners in creating

                     their own answers. They tend to use a casual speaking style.

 

2) Original Questions: There are five groups of five questions with no answers.

                                           They are introduced to give more choices to learners.

 

3) Food for Thought: Definitions, ideas, and links are offered for discussion and attention.

 

Explore the possibilities. Use the web. Make your own questions. Take equal turns.

 

 

 

~ Topic 15 ~ Money and Shopping ~ Questions for Conversation ~

Honor your mistakes, they will lead to learning...

Through this learning, more mistakes will be made…

Through this process, mistakes are no longer mistakes…

They become the act of learning.

 

TLW

 

                          

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